Note to Beef and Dairy cattle exhibitors:

Since the Health, Registration, and other rules for both the Dairy Contest and Beef Contest are very similar, we combined them.   Scroll down to see the current rules.

Fair-goers:

You may be interested in looking at the Livestock Terminology Table found at the bottom of the page.

Livestock Shows

Youth Beef Cattle Show
Youth Dairy Cattle Show
Working & Draft Cattle
Draft & Miniature Ponies
Poultry
Rabbit & Cavy Show
Sheep Show

Rules for the Dairy & Beef Cattle Contests

Registration rules:

  • All entry blanks for both events including showmanship and peewee showman must be received by August 8, 2015 and must be filled out completely: Name, Address, Phone and Date of Birth for each exhibitor. ENTRY FORM ( click here )
  • All entries received will be accepted on a first come, first serve basis until the barn is full.
  • $2.00 Entry fee per animal. Send entries and entry fees to the Superintendent
  • ANIMALS MUST BE ON THE FAIR GROUNDS BY 6:00 PM ON FRIDAY.

Health rules for Beef and Dairy Cattle

  1. All animals over 6 months for beef (3 months for dairy) must have a rabies vaccination certificate.
  2. Exhibitors must have health certificates for beef (plus test charts, and vaccination certificates for dairy) in order to show their livestock at Connecticut Fairs and Shows.
  3. All entries must originate in a Tuberculosis-Negative herd, and from Brucellosis-Negative herds under state supervision.
  4. If animals originate from out-of-state, they must be from Brucellosis-Negative herds blood tested within 12 months. Official vaccinates over 18 months of age and non-vaccinates over 8 months old must be negative to the blood test within 30 days prior to shipment, and must be Tuberculosis-Negative, tested within 12 months of fair.
  5. The Beef Committee and Dairy Committee reserve the right to reject any entry in question, and to remove any animal from the grounds for health reasons.

Other rules for Beef & Dairy Cattle

  1. Animals must be owned or leased by 5/1/2015.
  2. Youth must be 7 years old by 1/1/2015.
  3. Registration and lease papers are requested (required).
  4. All animals should be in show condition for competition.
  5. All livestock must remain on the grounds until 6:00 pm Sunday.
  6. Bedding - sawdust only, will be supplied by the Fair.
  7. Where there is no competition, the judge will award ribbon and prize money as he/she sees fit.
  8. Herdsmanship contest sponsored by the Fair. The junior exhibitor doing the best job of taking care of their exhibit space will be awarded a trophy.
  9. ANY EXHIBITOR CONSUMING OR DISPENSING ALCHOLOIC BEVERAGES IN THE DAIRY BARN OR ON THE FAIR GROUNDS WILL FORFEIT THEIR PREMIUM MONEY.

Common Cattle Terms

Heifer - Young female that has never had a calf.
Steer - Male castrated at an early age before sex characteristics developed.
Bull - Uncastrated male of any age.
Stag - Male that was castrated after sex characteristics were developed.
Cow - Female that has had one or more calves.
Dam - The cow that is the mother of a particular calf.
Yearling - Heifer steer or bull between one and two years old.
Sire - The bull that is the father of a particular calf.
Polled - Cattle that are born without horns.
Wean - To separate a calf from its mother.
Registered     - An animal whose name has been recorded in the records books of
            its breed association. The sire and dam must also be recorded. 
            The association gives the animal a number (registration number) 
            and a certificate of registration. Only purebred animals may be registered. 
Pedigree - A tracing of the ancestry of an animal.
Calves - Young cattle less than one year old.
Breeder - The owner of the parents of a calf at the time of mating.
Castrate - To remove the testes from male cattle.
Breed - A group of cattle that have the same external characteristics and that
           pass these traits on to each generation.
Crossbred - The offspring resulting by mating different breeds or cattle.
Self-feed - The practice of allowing an animal to run to a finishing feed all the time.

Cattle are raised for three primary reasons:

  • as livestock for meat (beef and veal)
  • as dairy animals for milk and other dairy products
  • as draft animals (oxen or bullocks) for pulling carts and plows

The Bridgewater Fair has cattle shows and contests in these as well as other areas.